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Errata:

Story Error Correction Date of Initial Release Date of Correction Formats Corrected
Romeo & Juliet “Recant for me the fate of Abel,” Elizabeth requested. “Recant” changed to “Recount” June 1st, 2023 December 1st, 2023 HTML, txt, txt (66 CPL), pdf (magazine), pdf (paperback)
Romeo & Juliet “You recant the death of Abel truly, but not the ultimate fate of Abel. Know ye no further?” “recant” changed to “recount” June 1st, 2023 December 1st, 2023 HTML, txt, txt (66 CPL), pdf (magazine), pdf (paperback)
Romeo & Juliet Perhaps one of the two others would be able to recant the details. “recant” changed to “recount” June 1st, 2023 December 1st, 2023 HTML, txt, txt (66 CPL), pdf (magazine), pdf (paperback)
Romeo & Juliet “See to that, then. And perhaps after, we may sit down all together, and if either of you have a better memory of last night than I, recant it for me to the minute.” “recant” changed to “recount” June 1st, 2023 December 1st, 2023 HTML, txt, txt (66 CPL), pdf (magazine), pdf (paperback)
Sister Shim and the Priestess Om “The work abroad was worthy, but the day to day bolsters ones soul.” “ones” changed to “one’s” February 1st, 2023 December 1st, 2023 HTML, txt, txt (66 CPL), pdf
The Dethroning of Vermilion Von Scaldis Ten minutes from the creaking beginning, ones eyes would begin to tear up, and their nose would begin to run, and their lips and throat would feel dry and irritated. “ones” changed to “one’s” April 1st, 2023 December 1st, 2023 HTML, txt, txt (66 CPL), pdf
The Dethroning of Vermilion Von Scaldis To stick ones nose any further into this was insanity. “ones” changed to “one’s” April 1st, 2023 December 1st, 2023 HTML, txt, txt (66 CPL), pdf
Steep and Dangerous There are the calm oceans of the world, and there are the roiling border seas; between the calm white and the calm red, the roiling pink fraught with whitecaps and whirlpools. If ones ship is taken into such a whirlpool at a border sea, and they have grave business unfinished, they will arrive at the Island of Yai, where the Oracle of Ma’ir resides. “ones” changed to “one’s” May 1st, 2023 December 1st, 2023 HTML, txt, txt (66 CPL), pdf
Cheer’s Journey Alas, such simple comforts came to an end when Percival said to to me, in a bored conversation in the meeting hall, “It seems like you aren’t able to secure the Jaishi peninsula after all.” removed the repeated “to” September 1st, 2023 December 1st, 2023 HTML, txt, txt (66 CPL), pdf
Cheer’s Journey Cheek let the way to the second door on the right, and held it open for me, standing back in the small space further down the passage. “let” changed to “led” September 1st, 2023 December 1st, 2023 HTML, txt, txt (66 CPL), pdf
Cheer’s Journey As I was nearing the end of the day’s log, Solok entered the quarters, and his unruly dog, who was so bold as to push even his master aside to run into the quarters first, leaping up onto Solok’s bed and then over to mine. “his” changed to “its” as well as changing “who” to “which” September 1st, 2023 December 1st, 2023 HTML, txt, txt (66 CPL), pdf
Cheer’s Journey Let me clear about one thing: I hate dogs. added “be” September 1st, 2023 December 1st, 2023 HTML, txt, txt (66 CPL), pdf
Cheer’s Journey There were not tricks of forced perspective: Mirlo and the other natives performed their talents openly, inviting others to check their work, has he had invited us to hold the rock. “has” changed to “as” September 1st, 2023 December 1st, 2023 HTML, txt, txt (66 CPL), pdf
Formthief You see the city hall, where the townsfolk have put away their pitchforks, and many happy reunions are taking place, which much nuzzling and praise and excitement. “which” changed to “with” as well as changing the Version comment from “1.0.0” to “1.0.1” April 3rd, 2023 December 1st, 2023 HTML
Fallow From the edge of the water, past a bush that was farther out on the finger of land, a deep voice called to all who might it, “Is someone there?” added “hear” September 1st, 2023 December 21st, 2023 HTML, txt, txt (66 CPL), pdf
Fallow He handed the jacket out of his later self. “of” changed to “to” September 1st, 2023 December 21st, 2023 HTML, txt, txt (66 CPL), pdf
Vol. I No. 11 Poetry Making out with a dog’s buthole a second time “buthole” changed to “butthole” November 1st, 2023 December 21st, 2023 HTML, txt, txt (66 CPL), pdf


A Context For These Errata

One evening, I was talking with Brass Bulldog. We were joking around, I don’t remember the exact conversation, but doing a goofy character voice, I said something to the effect of, “Recant for me the tale of the robot and the dog.” Something like that. And he said, “Recant?” Indeed, recant! A real ten dollar word, not the kind of word you get to know about without cracking open a book or two. Smartly, I explained to Brass that recant meant “to tell a story.” He said it did not mean that at all. After looking it up, I found out that, oh, big whoopsie-doopsie, indeed, “Recant” means just about the opposite of what I thought it did: Recant does not mean to tell a story, but rather, to take something back, to state that you have changed your stance on something.

Well, bugger. Immediately, I thought about how that’s definitely a word I’ve used in my stories, and it’s come across the editing desk for the Zooey Dot Pub magazine as well. I did a search while we were there on the call, and Brass and I had a giggle about some of the ways that “recant” accidentally still works in a scene, or the ways that “recant” accidentally makes a character say the complete opposite of what I was going for. “Recant” specifically, in To Thine Own Self Be Zoo, turns out to only show up in the novelization of Romeo & Juliet. Overall, this mistake isn’t something that would ruin that story, but it is something that I would wish to correct.

There are other mistakes here and there as well, that have, as I write this, stood free from correction. One typo comes to mind in Cheer’s Journey, just an incorrect word, where it’s obvious what the intended word was, but it does make the reader have to double back over the sentence to figure that out, and potentially really takes the reader out of the moment. Another item that would warrant correcting is that I fully believed with the pronoun one, as in, “One would like to eat ice cream if one were able,” it did not need an apostrophe to make it possess something, because it is a pronoun: to me, from his, hers, ours, yours, its, and theirs, ones followed: “Ones favorite flavor of ice cream is a matter of ones own valid personal opinion.” I could swear I even researched it pretty thoroughly before arriving at that. But, whatever misfire happened in my thinking there, it turns out that ones is incorrect too: the word does get an apostrophe, and the correct version would be, “One’s favorite flavor of ice cream is a matter of one’s own valid personal opinion.” This “ones” thing didn’t bother me as much as recant, I think because it’s a more technical detail, something that someone frequently engaged in reading is likely used to glossing over and assuming that it’s some difference in regional spelling or something like that. It’s also not an error that interrupts the narrator’s voice, if you imagine it being read out loud.

So, known errors have stood before. But it was—maybe fittingly—recant that made me decide they should be corrected in some fashion.

Besides these errors which have stood, there have also been errors that have been corrected silently after publication, or technical items that have been revamped. I have a vague memory of correcting one or two typos here or there, though as I write this now, I cannot remember what they would have been. Maybe all of them as minor as changing a straight upright apostrophe to a slanted apostrophe, but maybe a spelling correction or two has happened as well. There have also been technical aspects of the website that have been silently changed, for example, many stories at one time made use of style attributes in HTML to style text such as centering it or underlining something: in all instances, these have been replaced with standalone HTML elements such as center and u, as a personal preference. Usually with that, it is invisible to the reader that such a change has ever been made, except in rare cases where something is foregone because there is no standalone HTML element equivalent, such as losing the small caps from the headings in Romeo & Juliet.

So, some errors have stood, while other items have been changed. Why is that? Mainly, there is one reason. I have an aversion to muddling the record when it comes to things people may have had some emotional experience with. If I put out a story that used the word recant incorrectly 4 different times, maybe someone had already read that, has some memory of that word, and then goes back to check and it now says recite or recount. I don’t want them to feel gaslit over that. So far, all 12 issues of To Thine Own Self Be Zoo are released into the public domain—this is not made overly obvious, but there is a note in each issue’s PDF making it so. I think, with these being in the public domain, it’s unlikely to ever matter in a legal sense if there was a typo in a story released in June that was corrected in December, but in case it ever does become relevant, to law, to history, or to personal experiences, I want the record to be clear. I wish I had kept one from the start, but, short of doing a lot of careful digging through old files, the best I can do is to begin here, December 1st of 2023, at the completion of Volume I. Nothing too much will have been missed in the preceding time, and maybe there is some fun in leaving still that spice of primordial pre-record mystery to those who would care that much for utter completeness.

As a policy on errata, my intent is nearly only to correct technical errors on the spelling and punctuation level. My intent is not, for example, to go back in and rewrite the ending of a particular story that I realized afterwards could have been something else if the characters had done this instead of that. My intent is also not perfection: though this project does follow a style guide, it does not endeavor to do so robotically, and many commas may go or not go where another editor would prescribe, sentences may run on, characters and voicey narrators may use grammatical constructions that are not “good English,” and things of that nature. Even logical errors, “plot holes” or anachronisms, I think are usually more fun to let stand, and to let the reader imagine how the author is correct and how this seeming “plot hole” has come to actually be the case in the story, rather than pointing out how it is incorrect and assuming an impossible-to-reconcile meta flaw in the story—I do promise this is not just my opinion as an author, but also something that I do as a reader. I do not even intend to correct style choices that I would endeavor to make differently now, such as if an animal was called “it” instead of “they” even by a character who is deeply empathetic and mindful towards animals. Tidying up language around pronouns may be fair game in some circumstances, such as if a typo leads to misgendering a character unintentionally, but “it” used carelessly can be a mark of an earlier author who was not yet used to writing from a stance of zoophilia so openly. Primarily, the only goal here is to correct things that are objectively language-level errors that create a potential stumbling block to the reading experience, correcting “ones” to “one’s” and “recant” to “recount,” things of that nature.

And, to make the record, at least from here forward, there will be this page. Errors and corrections that are described here have been corrected where they appear in the stories. I will also include odds and ends of other kinds of changes—screenshots of old designs of the site and things of that sort.

Allow me to recant these errors.

signed,
Mrs Eggshell Ghosthearth
December 1st, 2023



Homepage text during Volume I:

Welcome! This is the homepage for To Thine Own Self Be Zoo, a zoosexual literary endeavor with works distributed online and possibly occasionally on tape to a random library shelf near you. These stories and poems work to explore the theme of animal empathy and the transcendent love it entails~

New issues are currently being released on the 1st of each month. The podcast feed operates on a freeform schedule, and will have episodes released as they are finished.

For other zoo endeavors, check out Zooier Than Thou for great zoo sketches and discussions, Zooey Magazine to find out why being a dog is kinda zoophilic, and Zoo & Me to hear zoo voices talk about advancing the zoo agenda.

Website design when the project first launched:



December 21st, 2023: Issue α

When uploading the December issue of Volume 1, I updated the text on the homepage, so that instead of saying new issues would be released on the first of each month, it instead said that issues would be released on solstices and equinoxes. The idea was that this was the plan for 2024: Volume 2 would be made of 4 issues, instead of 12. However, I missed that after December 1st, when I updated that text, there was still technically a solstice to occur in 2023, on December 21st. Well, I promised new issues were being released on solstices and equinoxes now, and I thought it would be fun to quickly put together a bonus issue in light of that oversight, and so, that's what Issue α is, a supplemental issue to Volume 1, released on December 21st, 2023, the winter solstice.